Letters to the Editor | ParkRecord.com

Letters to the Editor

PR,

Amid strong field, three rise to the top

Editor:

It’s been a tough year to figure out which candidates will be most capable of taking Park City forward. All six candidates for three seats have been positive, polite and forthcoming. We are fortunate to have some terrific choices, so if you vote differently than I, we’ll be in strong shape. The candidates are ALL good ones. Just my two cents:

Andy Beerman .because he has been fighting on the City Council consistently for environmental sustainability, including traffic abatement; because as a Main Street Business owner, he has a clear understanding of Main Street business and our need to preserve our historical integrity; and because he is a full participant in our recreation amenities. He understands the tourism base of our economy, but he also believes in economic diversification. His strong leadership is quiet and from the heart and his vision for the future is amazing.

Nann Worel .because she has amazing management skills and a remarkable facility for collaboration and inclusion. Her passion for our "underserved population" is laudable. Nann’s leadership of the Planning Commission and her position as Executive Director of People’s Health Center have given her a clear understanding of our passions and our processes. She’s absolutely up to speed and ready to serve. She’ll have no learning curve. She’s ready to serve.

Rory Murphy .because no person in the race has given more time, across the board, to more causes that make Park City great. He also has served on the Planning Commission, chaired Sundance Advisory, coached and guided Lacrosse, chaired the Park City School District Master Planning Committee, and worked with Wasatch County Transportation. He is a collaborator and can help us reach out to our regional partners to achieve our goals.

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I’ve worked extensively with all three of these amazing people and guarantee you that they’ll work very hard for you. Again, we’re in great shape this year with this terrific field of candidates. Please take the time to vote.

Sally Elliott

Park City

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Melville best suited to work with Vail Resorts

Editor:

Regarding the upcoming elections for City Council — I would like to explain "why" I am endorsing Hope Melville for City Council.

Our town faces significant challenges over the next few years. From my perspective these include: development, environmental, transit, regional planning, historic preservation, protection of Park City’s "value system" and keeping a watchful eye on the intentions of Vail Resorts.

Regarding this last item — Vail is making major investments to position Park City as their flagship resort. We must forge a relationship with them based upon "equality." Left to their own intentions, Vail will act in the best interests of Vail. Such is the behavior of corporations.

City Council must take the lead to create a proactive mutually beneficial partnership with Vail. A "win/win" scenario is best for both parties.

I have known Hope the past eight years. We share a common appreciation for the many factors that make Park City a truly special place to live. Hope possesses the intellect, passion, diligence, toughness and "caring" to help City Council and thus Park City to successfully manage the challenges confronting us.

Thank you for allowing me to explain why I endorse Hope Melville for City Council.

David Nicholas

Park City

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Gerber is dedicated, optimistic, enthusiastic

Editor:

Having lived in Park City for 15 years now, I’ve seen many friends come and go; pretty typical for a ski town as people move for a ‘real’ job, cheaper housing, or to be close to their families again. But Becca Gerber has been one of the constants through these years, and I’ve watched as she’s transitioned through college, to working for ski resorts, non-profits, and now working as the Director of Sales and Marketing for Aloha Ski and Sport.

Over the past several years, I’ve relied on her optimism and intelligence to help me work through questions and problems, and I know she’s brought those same skills to the companies she’s worked for and the community organizations she’s become involved with. Now that she is running for Park City Council, I’m excited for her to put those traits to work in service of the city as a whole.

Looking at her calendar over the past several months, I’ve seen firsthand how many hours she’s devoted to preparing for this position by attending City Council meetings, meeting with local leaders, and canvassing the neighborhoods. She has not only been educating herself on the issues, but she takes the time to listen to opposing viewpoints and understand how people see each side of the issue. It is this dedication and enthusiasm for learning that makes her perfect to be among the next generation of Park City leaders.

Meg Steele

Park City

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It’s common courtesy, pick up after your dog

Editor:

Park City needs to clean up its act! I’m sure all of us have stepped in dog poop or seen a doggie bag on the side of a trail. People also don’t want to step in your dog’s doodoo. Dog poop is like a dumpster. It smells bad and no one wants to deal with it. So be responsible and pick it up. It’s not that hard to do. Once you pick up your poop, you put it in a bag. The purpose of the bags are simple. Pick up your dog’s poop then leave it on the side of the trail so you can pick it up on the way back. Some people may pick up their poop, but then they leave their bag behind. So be considerate, pick up your poop and don’t leave the bag out on our trails. So let’s pick up the poop and force ourselves to be cleaner town.

Caitlin Hickey

Park City

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Hope Melville will stand up to special interests

Editor:

On Nov. 3, residents of Park City will go to the polls to select who will serve as city council members for the next four years. Each of us will have the opportunity to select 3 individuals to fill the open positions. I would like to encourage all voters to cast one of their votes for Hope Melville.

Our town will be facing many challenges in the coming years. Hope possesses the skillset we need to navigate through these challenges ensuring that the interests of the citizens of Park City are well represented ahead of special interests. I would encourage everyone to meet Hope, either in person or through her website. I think you will be quickly impressed by her qualifications and agree she is someone we all need to be leading our city government.

Ellsworth S Clarke

Park City

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School bond needs another look

Editor:

I would like to express my concern over the 56 million dollar bond the school board is now proposing. As a long time Park City resident and teacher, I think the school board’s decision will have a tremendous impact on our community as far as education, traffic, and how each day is lived in our town.

The 12 million part of the bond that includes athletic facilities seems unnecessary since apparently Snyderville is planning a fieldhouse and one at the junction already exists.

I do think a third solution is available, which is to go back and look at this again, and try to get it right.

Carolyn Meyer

Park City

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Bond is vital to performing arts

Editor:

With the population growth that the real estate boom in Park City has created I feel we have no choice but to vote in favor of the upcoming school bond. Misleading editorial letters imply that the bond solely focuses on upgrading the athletic facilities. And while that’s part of what the bond is for, a huge portion of the money will also go to upgrading our performing arts facilities.

For example, the music department alone has doubled in the last 10 years. Practice rooms are being used for theatre storage, and expensive instruments are routinely stored in the music hallway. These instruments are owned by PCSD, so if they’re stolen or damaged, it’s the taxpayers that ultimately pay to replace them. The bond will alleviate these deficits and many more in all areas of the fine arts.

I know for a fact that our seniors annually receive hundreds of thousands of dollars in music scholarships from colleges. And if you count scholarships for all our fine arts students (film, photography, dance, art, sculpture, etc.) it’s probably closer to a million. Most of these students do not major in music or fine arts, just as most athletic scholarships do not go to P.E. majors. But I know firsthand that extracurricular activities can pay a kid’s way through college.

If we as a community support development and growth, then we must also support the resulting infrastructure — and that includes backing our kids with a well-rounded education that gets them into college.

Stacy Dymalski

Park City

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Worel has experience the council needs

Editor:

When I envision Nann Worel as a member of the Park City Council, I see consciousness and experience focused on the needs and desires of Park City residents, and the betterment of the community.

She is the right person to help Park City navigate the current challenges and take advantage of future opportunities.

While working with Nann at the People’s Health Clinic I found that she was able to quickly prioritize and direct her talents and endless energy on project elements that would effectively make a difference. Her vast array of experiences brought first-hand knowledge so that choices could be made based on facts. Her ability to focus on the future assisted in making sound and educated decisions.

Your vote for Nann will produce positive results for Park City residents and the community.

Robbie L. Beck

Park City

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Nann will listen to the public

Editor:

I first met Nann Worel while on the Board of People’s Health. Although her work there put PHC on the National map for what it has become, what I want to talk about is the time I spent with Nann on the Park City Planning Commission.

We served together for about 4 years and in that time I found Nann to consistently be prepared and fully informed on each issue that came in front of us. She was always ready with pertinent comments and thoughtful questions. She was a good listener and knew how to make the applicant and public feel she heard what they had to say. If her vote was against an applicant or the staff recommendation it was always in a respectful manner.

While Chair of the Planning Commission, Nann displayed a talent for bridging gaps and finding common ground when opinions were diverse.

With this background I feel she will bring skills that make a great Councilperson. Also, with her ability to listen, Nann will be someone that has a clear understanding of where the residents would like Park City to be in the future.

Charlie Wintzer

Park City

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If we could, we’d vote for Nann

Editor:

One troublesome issue for "second-home owners" like us is a Utah law that keeps us from voting in Park City elections because our "primary" residence is located in another state. Although we have paid Park City and Summit County property taxes and supported local businesses and charities for 29 years, Utah law prevents us from being fully responsible citizens of our community.

To be honest, this has not been a huge issue for us in the past because we’ve never known any of the candidates well enough to be strongly and wisely committed to one. This year’s election for City Council is different because Nann Worel is running.

What’s so special about Nann? She’s an intelligent, energetic, experienced manager who proved her remarkable leadership skills as Executive Director of the People’s Health Clinic. She has demonstrated great judgement and an unbending commitment to fairness as a member of the Park City Planning Commission. Nann Worel is a team player who can bring disparate groups and different factions together to meet the critical needs of our community.

Nann’s professional colleagues around the country recognized these qualities and abilities by electing her President of the National Association of Free and Charitable Clinics. We need those same qualities and abilities at work in Park City, and we’re hoping that she’ll be elected to the City Council. We’d fly up just to vote for her ourselves, but state law prevents us from registering. We’re writing now in the hope that some of you who don’t know Nann Worel as well as we do — and who are not yet committed to another candidate — will cast your votes for Nann on our behalf.

Art Ulene, MD and Priscilla Ulene

Park City

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Homegrown Gerber is right for Park City

Editor:

Please vote for Becca Gerber in the upcoming City Council election. Becca is hardworking, a good listener and committed to preserving our wonderful community as we navigate the changes and challenges that face Park City in the coming years.

Becca is smart, thoughtful and thorough in her approach. As a "home grown" woman, she understands our issues first-hand having served on numerous committees and having been involved in countless community events through the years. She will work hard for our environment, seek out rational traffic and transportation options, and promote effective housing and workforce solutions.

Becca is proud to be part of Park City. She will provide the perfect balance on the City Council as we tackle the challenges ahead. Please vote for Becca on November 3rd to serve our City Council.

Marion Boland

Park City

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Howl-O-Ween Dog Parade is going to be a real treat this year

Editor:

I love Park City because we love our parades and we love our dogs. I can’t wait for another Howl-O-Ween Parade where both combine. This year, I hear it’s going to be even better with an official parade route on Lower Main Street as we parade our mutts and ourselves towards Heber Avenue thanks to the Historic Park City Alliance. So, Dooper and I will see all our fellow Halloween and Dog Lovers at 4:45pm at the Lower Main Street Pedestrian Bridge!

Pat Mitchell

Park City

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I Support Andy Beerman for City Council

Editor:

I Support Andy Beerman for City Council because he has proven to be incredibly capable of transforming his passion for this city, it’s people, its landscapes, and it’s quality of life into tangible and meaningful action that is both making Park City a better place while maintaining all that we hold dear. Andy’s leadership and active engagement in the betterment of our community has earned him Park City’s Environmental Hero Award, twice as Utah Recycler of the Year and a position of immense influence on the Board of the Mountain Accord in which he has been dogged in tenaciously and effectively advocating for what is best for Park City’s vibrant future. I know, because I serve with him.

Andy is not only a very successful businessmen (he and his partner Thea own & run Main Street’s Treasure Mountain Inn) but he is also one of the most committed, hardworking, forward thinking City Council members that has ever served this community (and we have had quite a few exemplary council members). His more than 20 year resume of community engagement in Park City is unmatched and a few highlights include serving on the Basin & City Open Space Committees, Mountain Trails, Mountain Accord, and he was the past president of the Historic Park City Business Alliance.

Anyone who has worked for, with, or around Andy Beerman (which includes me in a variety of capacities) speaks highly of his abilities, intelligence, leadership, candor, energy, listening skills, and true collegiality. Andy’s success in both the public and business sectors combined with has warmth, engaging demeanor, huge, disarming smile, make him a truly phenomenal Park City Council member who we need to reelect. This is why, as both a business leader and engaged PC citizen, I am supporting Andy.

Peter Metcalf

Park City

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Bond alternatives were already considered

Editor:

I would like to remind everyone that this vote is not on whether or not you like the proposed master plan, but rather it’s on how to pay for it.

A lot of the comments that I’ve heard when people speak out against the bond are really about the master plan. I hear people saying we should take another year to look at alternatives. But we don’t need another year to look at alternatives. Why? Because that’s what we just did.

A lot of people have not been paying attention to the master planning process. They probably knew it was going on, because it was widely publicized, but they chose not to pay attention. I’m sure they had their reasons. Now people are throwing out alternatives as if they were brand new ideas. But they’re not new ideas. They were already considered, and rejected, during the master planning process. That’s what the master planning process is — looking at your needs, generating alternatives, and selecting the best one.

So when people say let’s just wait a year and look at alternatives, I say we don’t need to do that because we’ve already done that. We already know what the best alternative is. Now we just need to decide how to pay for it.

Of course we could spend another year to get all those people who haven’t been paying attention until now up to speed. We would spend a year talking and listening and then end up with the same plan we have right now, except that it would end up costing us more. We would spend one more year maintaining Treasure. We would have to add more trailers, at the cost of about $100k each per year. And construction costs would most likely go up. All that is not necessary.

The proposed bond would cost the average homeowner $125 a year. That’s really not a lot of money. If a tax levy is issued, it would cost the average home owner around $500 a year. For many of us, that is manageable. But for others in our community $500 a year is more than they can manage. They could afford the bond, but not a tax levy. We already know that the proposed master plan is the best way for us to improve our schools. Now we just need to do the responsible thing and vote for the best way to pay for it. Vote Yes on the proposed school bond while it is affordable for all of us.

Riki Case

Park City