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Letters to the Editor

Vote for Bob Richer

Editor:

So you think the traffic at Kimball’s Junction is bad and that every piece of vacant property in Snyderville Basin is being developed? Perhaps you don’t realize how much worse it could be without the growth management skills and commitment of County Commissioner Bob Richer. Development pressure on the Basin is intense! One commissioner serving one term can’t correct the planning mistakes of the last 10 to 20 years, but allowing Bob Richer to serve another term will build on the wise decisions he has made during his first term. Over time, his sound growth management orientation will influence the entire county in a very positive way. Bob Richer is a resident of the Basin, unlike his opponent. He is vastly more experienced and capable of understanding the issues of Snyderville Basin and its citizens. Please remember to vote for Bob on Nov. 7. Sitting at home or work, thinking about it, just doesn’t get it done.

Clay Stuard

Park City

Support Proposition 1

Editor:

Over the 16 years that I have lived in Summit County, I have witnessed the extraordinary growth that has taken us from a semi-rural environment to a significant crossroads for tourism, for people moving here and working here, retiring here, as well as being a community of choice for people who work in Salt Lake.

We now have traffic congestion; periodic water scarcity and their accompanying political tussles; an immigrant population to be assimilated; complex planning and development issues; and the list goes on. So, how do we manage all this? We do it with three part-time county commissioners who are stretched, due to the volume of work.

Our commissioners don’t even have a full-time manager to carry out their decisions and integrate county activities. This has to change. That is why I support Proposition 1. It will give us five part-time elected county council members, and a full-time manager with the training and experience to carry out the council’s directives.

Diane Mellen

Park City

Kudos to PCHS Key Club

Editor:

On Friday, Oct. 20, McPolin Elementary School had a fantastic Freaky Fall Festival due to the efforts of an army of volunteer parents and a very special group of high school students. Park City High School’s Key club, a service group led by president Alexis Brown, manned games, painted faces, distributed prizes, worked the concession stand and any other duties asked of them. They are a delightful group of students who displayed responsibility and commitment to service for their community and are wonderful role models for our younger students. It was a pleasure to meet them and work with them.

Apologies for not naming each one individually and showing our appreciation to them as well as to the sponsors who made our event a screaming success!

Gratefully yours,

Laura Pollard

on behalf of the McPolin PTO

Endorsing Bob Richer

Editor:

Make sure you cast your vote in this crucial election. Your vote can truly make a difference for the future of our county. Western Summit County is notorious for poor voter turnouts in the county elections. If you want to be represented by a candidate who is familiar with problems unique to Park City and the immediate surrounding area, I encourage you to vote for Bob Richer who, from my first-hand experience, has always been responsive to the concerns of his Summit County constituents. He takes time to listen and understand the issues. Bob has helped the Sun Peak community by hearing our concerns about development and water issues. His experience has been key to his excellent leadership as chairman of the Board of County Commissioners during this critical time in determining the future of Summit County.

On Nov. 7, please show up. Let your voice be heard. Cast your vote with the right choice for Park City and Summit County. Vote for Bob Richer.

Brenda Lake

Park City

Enough government?

Editor:

I’ve read that the opponents to the change of form of county government (Proposition No. 1) claim it would mean big government. Big government v. small government. How about discussing enough government?

Is our three-person, part-time government enough? Enough to deal with our growth, complexity and the issues we face now and in the future? We should have enough government to do the job right. Our present form won’t cut it, and perhaps should have been changed some time ago. Let’s do it now, for the future, for us. Get out and vote on Nov. 7 for Proposition No. 1.

Ted Bartkoski

Park City

School board election

Editor:

I have known and worked with Michael Boyle for more than 15 years. I believe Michael will make an excellent school board member for the following reasons.

1) At the Snyderville Basin Water Reclamation District he handily manages multi-million dollar construction projects. This experience will be valuable in a school district with significant construction projects.

2) Michael’s people skills are outstanding. They range from team building and goal setting to negotiating difficult situations.

3) Every year Michael works with budgets exceeding a million dollars. He has the ability to analyze, comprehend and help manage the school district budget.

4) Michael works hard and has the ability to simplify complex situations.

Please support Michael Boyle for the School District.

Sincerely

Jan Wilking

Park City

Surprise tow job

Editor:

We were having a friendly game of poker last Friday night at a friend’s condominium in Deer Valley Daystar condos to be exact. Midnight rolled around when we decided to break up the game and head home. I went out first and couldn’t believe that four of us had been towed.

I don’t know about you, but if someone in my neighborhood were creating a disturbance if that’s what you call it by parking his car in the street (if I did anything at all) I would have the decency to knock on the door and talk to someone. Come on people, if a dog is wandering through your yard, you don’t call the dogcatcher. You call the number on the dog tag and get it back to the owner.

Daystar Homeowners Association should be ashamed, and they should also send me the $175 it took to bail my truck out.

Jim Delanty

Park City

Vote NO on open space

Editor:

I recently received a mailing from the city titled "Open Space Bond Facts" and "Voter Information." This little missive is more "infomercial" than information in that it devotes the entire contents to promoting the bond issue save for four possibly negative sentences. It is my contention that we are, indeed, surrounded by open space that has already been developed. These tax-paying entities are called ski resorts. As to assessed values, they certainly have gone up; in my case by 250 percent since the 1998 bond issue. This stealth tax increase hits hardest on folks who are retired or have no desire to sell out.

If this new bond is approved it will double the open-space burden to nearly $50 per $100,000 assessed valuation. For secondary homes and businesses it would be about $88 per. To put it in perspective, you will be paying about the same amount for fire protection or all county services as the bill for open space. This doesn’t make sense. Please vote NO on this issue.

Sincerely,

Thomas Hurd

Park City

Commendable performance

Editor:

Since Dave Edmunds took office nearly four years ago, Summit County has seen a marked improvement in the quality of law enforcement and in the professionalism expected of the public servants who protect the community.

Sheriff Edmunds seems to be a rising star. At the age of 34, he has already commanded a venue at the Winter Games, completed a bachelor’s degree, attended special training with the FBI at Quantico, been appointed to the state’s P.O.S.T. board, and has visibly and empirically impacted the Sheriff’s Office dramatically for the better.

I find it comforting that he is passionate about protecting the community.

Perhaps to the dismay of some, he has very high expectations for current and prospective employees. Not everyone is comfortable with someone who challenges the status quo and demands results and accountability. Perhaps that is understandable; it is simply unfortunate, though, that a few have resorted to subterfuge, borderline slander and ad hominem attacks and have either obscured or ignored actual issues.

The unadulterated facts, for those who are interested in making an educated decision this election day, indicate that Sheriff Edmunds, whether you love him or hate him, has made a positive difference in the county. Response times are lower, hiring standards are higher, training is more complete, and transparency is clearer. Sheriff Edmunds deserves to be re-elected.

Sincerely,

Rob Maynes

Menlo Park, Calif.

Warren Miller’s ‘Off The Grid’

Editor:

We want to thank Warren Miller for promoting Utah’s "Greatest Snow on Earth" in his newest ski movie "Off The Grid." He blatently flaunted our deep, dry powder to the world and brought back memories of getting face shots on every turn throughout March 2006.

The state of Utah will certainly reap the benefits of skiers arriving in droves looking to drop into one of our many bowls this upcoming season.

Cheers to you, Warren!

Sincerely,

Kelley and Dan Holtman

Park City

Park City’s precious resources

Dear editor:

We just moved to Park City and are awed every day by the natural beauty of the landscape here. In recent weeks we have noticed a number of articles in the news about precious water resources, air quality concerns and high gasoline prices. With this in mind, we could not help wonder what people are thinking as they try to manage the resources here.

One example seems to be the development of the grounds at the National Ability Center. This is an astounding complex, which undoubtedly adds a great deal to the community. However, with completion of the surrounding grounds, one has to wonder who is thinking of the future of the areas resources. What is the obsession with all the grass on the non-essential areas? Although nice to look at, it is an expensive, high-maintenance feature. It has to be watered and mowed, which translates into high-priced gasoline, creating air pollution and consuming precious water to maintain and manpower cost to mow.

With all the natural beauty of Utah around us, would it not make more sense to use indigenous landscaping? Should we not be setting a better example for our kids to carry forward?

Concerned newcomer,

Tom Farkas

Park City

Republicansfor Sonya Ray

Editor:

We have both been registered Republicans since we were first able to vote. However, we have crossed party lines on occasion to vote for an individual we feel is most qualified. One such individual, Sonya Ray, is currently running for Utah State Senate, District 26. Sonya has attended many legislative sessions and has devoted time and energy studying issues and gaining an understanding of the state legislative process.

Unlike some politicians today in all levels of government, Sonya has no political agenda other than to serve the people to the best of her ability. She has no affiliation with any businesses or special interest groups.

Sonya and her husband have raised a family rooted in strong values, which include integrity, service, self-reliance, accountability and civic responsibility.

Please take the time to get to know each of the candidates. You may find, as we have, that this is a time to set aside partisan politics and vote for Sonya Ray.

Sincerely,

Lane and Julie Hadlock

Vernal

Constitution Party

Editor:

This is something I never do, but I would like to at this time. I don’t know if what I think or what I believe will make any difference for anyone ever… but I do feel something. I’ve always been a Republican — just because of the simple beliefs that abortion is not the answer and that welfare is not the answer either. Then I watched the Republicans begin adding quite a bit of government to our lives. One day I wondered what my deceased great-grandfather would say if he were to simply be placed back on his farm. I think he would have not believed his eyes and would probably find himself in violation of some restraining ordinance in every move he made. I began watching for the new bills and laws being passed that threatened my great-grandfather’s way of life. In comparison, this country is not the same United States we as a people lived in 75 years ago. So do we just give up, do we just watch candidate after candidate promise the moon to every special interest group? Is that what we are about… pleasing everyone, all the time?

Frankly, I kept my membership as a Republican up until 2004. Then a friend invited my husband and me to go listen to the United States presidential candidate for the Constitution Party. We went to hear him in Orem. As several speakers began to speak, I kept shaking my head, was I hearing this right? Principles over politics? That was a new concept for me. I closed my eyes and allowed myself to simply feel what I was hearing. There was something there. It was bigger than even basic integrity. It was what our founding fathers wanted for us. As we left the event that evening, we were sobered by the "call" to begin looking at a new way… or rather the "old" way. Great-grandfather would have been a part of this without question. A quick look at http://www.cputah.org/ can give a new insight to how you vote in November.

Thank you for listening!

Lorinda Baker Luck

Vernal


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