Letters to the Editor, Jan 16-19, 2016 | ParkRecord.com

Letters to the Editor, Jan 16-19, 2016

PR,

Say goodbye to dark skies in Old Town

Editor:

Good example? I think not

A couple weeks ago The Park Record had a front page article about the new workforce housing building on Empire Avenue. In it there is a quote from the developer about setting "a good example for future development." If this developer thinks that constructing a building in a densely populated area that has three stories of floor-to-ceiling glass walls in the well-lit halls is setting a good example, then maybe we need to look elsewhere for our role models. The light cast from this building bathes the residences on Woodside Ave. below in light so brilliant that it lights up the entire neighborhood.

I know that growth will happen and more light is inevitable, but to blatantly and unnecessarily add to that problem with some developer’s personal architectural vision, with no regard to their affected neighbors, is just plain bad karma.

We still have some semblance of a dark sky in Old Town, but judging from the city’s efforts in this case, and having over 40 (yes, I counted them) lights on all night at the new Library, it appears that they just don’t care about preserving that. California here we come!

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Ed Parigian

Park City

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Radical skiers and snowboarders put others at risk

To local great skiers and riders:

Are you (or your children) a rad skier/rider that can jump high cliffs? At Canyons’ Grande, perhaps? Have you pulled aside out-of-bound-ropes to do so?

It may be a great rush for you, but the missing rope may give just as big, but unwelcome rush to someone else that follows you. Read http://marcomessina.blogspot.com/2016/01/exorcising-ski-run.html

Marco Messina

Park City

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Someone needs to rein in out-of-control snowboarders

To Vail Resorts,

Yet another friend has been taken out by an out-of-control snowboarder at Park City. She will have to stay in a rehab facility with her severely broken ankle and a broken wrist. My other friend will never be the same due to a traumatic brain injury and multiple fractures caused by an out-of-control rider who crashed into her. There are more.

As a full-time Park City resident and Epic Pass holder, I am shocked by the number of out-of-control skiers and boarders at Park City and Canyons Resorts. The "Safety Patrol" in yellow are hardly ever around and the Skiers Responsibility Code is nowhere to be seen. At other ski resorts it is prominently displayed on lift towers where everyone would see it while riding the chair or on large signs in the lodges. Now it is on the napkins in the restaurants where nobody would even notice.

My friends, family and I have all been hit or narrowly missed by people skiing and boarding way too fast and out of control. While we all recognize that skiing has risks, Vail resorts could go a long way to reduce and prevent accidents and make skiing safer for everyone by:

1) Posting the Skiers Responsibility Code prominently all over the resorts.

2) Increasing numbers of safety patrols.

3) Pulling tickets of irresponsible skiers.

I hope Vail will step up and make the mountains safer for us all.

Jessica Strater

Park City

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Schools need to offer healthier lunches

Editor:

I’m currently a freshman at Treasure Mountain Junior High and a member of the Leadership-run EATS board. As a student within the Park City School District, it has come to my attention the true worth of the school lunches. Unfortunately, their nutritional value and student appeal is well below satisfactory.

Like many other students, I am an athlete with an increasingly high concern for my health. I’m a Nordic ski jumper training regularly at the Utah Olympic Park and it is necessary for me to keep in optimum physical condition. With experience in other sports, I can say that I am not alone in this.

Collectively, our efforts to stay healthy and able to compete at our best has led to a significant drop in purchases of school lunches. In a recent survey, we found that half of the students refuse to buy it, always bringing a home lunch. The reason is obvious and must be addressed. I am publicly asking for the Park City School District to focus more attention on the food the students are being fed and increase the appeal along with nutrition. I’m not alone in my opinion and am merely representing a large percentage of the student body. It is imperative that the issue is confronted and resolved, possibly during the planned realignment.

Sam Macuga

Park City