Letters to the Editor, June 3-6, 2017 | ParkRecord.com

Letters to the Editor, June 3-6, 2017

Submissions from Park Record readers

Students embrace mental health awareness


My name is Claire Booth and I’m with the PCHS Student Council. Connect Summit County came to my StuCo class early in the year to discuss ideas on how to spread mental awareness throughout our school. Their mission inspired us to create a mental health week in May to inform and engage students on the major illnesses and coping mechanisms. Together we produced a week filled with interactive learning experiences as well as popular guest speakers to spread awareness of mental illnesses.

Basin Recreation informed students about healthy ways to relieve stress along with therapy dogs we had provided by the PTSO. Dr. Melissa Lopez-Laron spoke to classes about mental illnesses while suicide survivor, Kevin Hines, recounted his journey to recovery after jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge. Students walked out of the Eccles Center with a new perspective of mental illnesses and how to analyze the signs of depression and suicide.

When Connect first came to my class looking ways to increase mental awareness, I immediately wanted to help. The past few years I've had multiple friends who have either been diagnosed with depression or have attempted suicide. I was constantly wracking my brain for ways I could've prevented their depression and how I didn't see the signs beforehand. Mental illnesses are an epidemic that is continuing to escalate on a national scale as well as in our community. Although it's a sensitive topic, refusing to discuss the topic or to validate people with mental illnesses will not reduce the stigma. I'm very grateful that my school gave us the opportunity to address mental illnesses and discuss the importance of mental health. I'm hoping to continue mental health week for future years to further unite PCHS as a supporting and accepting student body.

Claire Booth
Park City

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Those who condemn incivility should practice what they preach


Regarding Amy Roberts’ column on trail incivility on May 31: she is 100 percent correct on her five points of courteous trail behavior. With so many different ways to enjoy our trails, we all have to respect the rights of others when using them — it’s not that hard to do.

But why did she have to spoil her articulation of legitimate concerns by gratuitously and self-righteously associating bad trail behavior being “more common” with “the longer [President] Trump is in office,” as though there were a causal connection between the two? She is completely within her rights to take the cheap shot on the Op-Ed page, but it is also fair for me to object here.

No doubt she expected no approbation in the Park City community for her remark. And I’m sure she was confident that she would soon bask in plaudits from like-minded friends at her next Park City dinner party and in the hallways of The Park Record.

But for many of us, although Roberts’ remark pales by comparison to Kathy Griffin’s recent gruesome gaff, Roberts’ snide parenthetical threatens to lower the level of discourse in the public domain, in stark contradiction to her expressed concern for similar behavior on our Park City trails. No one wants (or expects) Roberts to suffer the same fate as Griffin, but she might do well to take advantage of the opportunity to engage in some soul searching on the subject of civility.

Bill Redkey
Heber City