Letters to the Editor, Oct. 31 – Nov. 3, 2015 | ParkRecord.com

Letters to the Editor, Oct. 31 – Nov. 3, 2015

PR,

City Hall works closely with PCSD on forward planning

Editor:

In all of the discussion back and forth about the School District Bond on the ballot this election, one piece that I want to be sure the community is aware of: The excellent working relationship between the entities involved in planning for both the capital projects and the impacts to the community.

Summit County, Park City Municipal, Park City School District and the Snyderville Basin Recreation District meet regularly to discuss issues and challenges that overlap between our respective missions. These meetings happen regularly and have been happening for years. We all have the community’s best interests in mind, but we have different goals and responsibilities, and we recognize the need to work together to achieve the best outcomes.

From managing fields to mitigating traffic impacts, we work well together and are committed to continuing to do so. Recently, we stepped up those interactions and developed a Task Force dedicated to working on items specific to the School District Bond. That committee has representation from each entity to continue the conversations regarding traffic, parking, athletic and recreational offerings including fields, field houses, tennis courts the list is long.

We share and manage fields and courts. We use the same roads and arteries. We partner to manage parking for important special events. And I believe we do it well.

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We do know that changes are coming, whether the bond passes or not.

I want the community to understand that all these entities are firmly committed to working together through whatever changes are coming to use all of our taxpayers’ money wisely and well, and to share and mitigate the impacts.

Personally, I will be voting in favor of the Bond. Because the funds will not be subjected to equalization and will stay in the School District, and because it has the lesser financial impact on property taxes, that seems to be the wise choice to me. I would urge everyone to dial back the emotion and rhetoric, and continue the philosophy we all hold so dear: the ability to agree to disagree, and still remain friends and neighbors.

And on another note, I completely agree with Alex Butwinski (Guest Editorial Oct 28-30) and could not have said it better: Please join me in voting for Andy Beerman, Becca Gerber and Nann Worel for City Council.

Liza Simpson

Park City

* * *

Show the locals some love

Editor:

I think we need to do something about the amount of tourists in Park City. Now I know they bring our town tons of money, but most of the locals just can’t deal with them. Locals should be the first priority, but instead the tourist are and it’s all because they bring money. Locals stay all year even when the snow is gone. Tourist don’t bring anything other than money, they just make traffic worse and crowd the buses. They also make Main Street extremely crowded and super long lines when locals wanna go out and eat at a restaurant, or at the ski resorts. Especially now that the canyons and Park City Mountain Resort have coalesced, that is going to bring so many more tourists! I think a good solution to this problem is to possibly have a locals hour or have some popular restaurants have a locals only day. This would solve a lot of conflict with the locals and the tourists. Thanks.

Marc Colaizzi,

Treasure Mountain Junior High School

* * *

Vail ownership good for Park City

Editor:

Since Vail has bought Park City Mountain Resort, and connected it to The Canyons, it has made many people wonder. In my opinion, I think that it was a really good idea to connect the two. Now, people can ski both resorts by riding a chairlift, instead of getting in your car and driving. Furthermore, now Park City is the biggest resort in the United States. That means that a lot of more people will want to ski it because it is the biggest. Although, there is one benefit to having more people ski it. The whole town will bring in more money because of people coming into Park City to ski. For example, the hotels will bring in more money, the ski resort will, and lastly, the restaurants. All that money will be a very good thing to Park City in General. Since Park City is a ski town, it relies on the ski resorts’ income for money. If no one comes to Park City and skis, then Park City would be in trouble. In conclusion, I think connecting the resorts was a good idea for these reasons: more convenient, the town of Park City will make more money, and it is now the biggest resort in the United States.

Mitchell Provines

Treasure Mountain Junior High School

* * *

Genuine appreciation for generous Parkites

Editor:

Last week my son and I were traveling from California to Colorado Springs when we experienced engine failure in the car we were driving, just as we crested the mountain on I-80 east of Salt Lake City. We coasted down the first exit and stopped at the stop sign, unable to go any further. It happened about 5:30 p.m. on Friday evening. I felt compelled to write to you to compliment many in your city who went "above and beyond" to help us.

A "Good Samaritan" immediately pulled over and offered to help us push our car off to the side of the road to a safe place. Next, the tow truck driver showed up within minutes of our call, and offered to take us to the only automotive repair shop he knew would be open on Saturday. When we arrived at Burt Brothers Automotive, although they had officially closed, they let us in anyway. While one gentleman took our information, the other serviceman took the time to find us a hotel room. Apparently, you have a very busy city and there were not many available! One of them then offered to take us to the Park City Peaks Hotel. Thankfully, there was a restaurant on site, so we did not have to worry about transportation for dinner.

The next morning, upon finding out that our car was not repairable, the desk clerk at the hotel helped us find a salvage yard and a rental car. The young lady at Hertz, although she was the only one in the office, drove over to the hotel and picked us up. Upon arriving at Burt Brothers, the service manager waived all fees for their services, and we were eventually able to find a salvage yard to come and take our car.

Although the circumstances of our visit to your beautiful city were awful, we could not have been more impressed by the many kindnesses extended to us. We realize the circumstances could have been far worse, if not for the many courtesies afforded us by your citizens. I hope you will be able to let them know how much it was appreciated.

Audrey Ogden and Kenny Osborne

Stockton, Calif.

* * *

School administration is contradicting itself

Editor:

It is now evident this school administration will do and say anything to get the bond approved, including contradicting themselves in practically the same sentence. The largest middle school campus in Utah is now really two schools according to Ember Conley, superintendent, as reported in a biased article on Saturday by Bubba Brown.

Fifth and sixth graders won’t mingle with 7th and 8th graders it is reported, with front offices and schedules completely different. Of course having two schools completely undermines Ms. Conley’s argument that one school is best because switching schools increases dropout rates, so when it is convenient we can call it one school.

The fact is the best studies say moving fifth graders out of elementary school leads to huge and lasting penalties to academic performance as outlined in the editorial "School Realignment Plan is Flawed" posted on 10/13 at the online Park Record or more fully on 10/14 in the Parkrag. The Parkrag essay also shows how full day kindergarten can cause serious emotional damage to children not developmentally ready with the academic benefits completely gone by the third grade.

In addition to emphasizing wants over needs, and sports over academics, this plan engages in a reckless academic and social experiment with your child that is not supported by the best research on school structure. All this is seemingly done to make room for a new field house, when two are already under consideration by the City and County, and a new football field, when the one we have was recently renovated at great expense. Vote No on this bond so we can vote yes on the right bond next year that really serves our children and community.

Peter Yogman

Park City

* * *

Trust Gerber with Park City

Editor:

Almost 13 years ago, my husband and I were looking for someone with whom to trust our children so that I could return to work. With our extended family far away, one of the greatest challenges of the life-work balance was finding someone who would care for our children like we do. A dear friend recommended Becca Gerber, fresh from college and juggling various ski town gigs. We hired her and, because I am confident that she will care for Park City the way she cared for my family, you should hire her too.

What we got when we invited Becca into our home was so much more than a babysitter. She was loving and affectionate, of course, but also honest and consistent, with high expectations, often silly and always protective. With smarts and wit, Becca inspired a love of books, never talked down, and tried (unsuccessfully) to pass along her comedic timing. She demonstrated good instincts whenever the unexpected happened, which with Irish twins happens quite a lot. Above all, Becca was always positive — and a positive influence.

Although Becca ultimately moved on to positions in event planning and marketing, the qualities that made her a valued member of our family are the same qualities that have made her a successful young businesswoman and will make her a great city councilor. Park City is her town, the town in which she grew up, graduated Park City High School and University of Utah, and chose as her adult home. She is protective of its historical character, diverse community, and sustainable future. Becca attacks problems like they are there to be solved. And she has the smarts, creativity, energy and good instincts to solve them. Becca will be a good representative of her generation, whose history and vision, people skills and positive nature will help bridge gaps and broker thoughtful progress.

Years ago, we trusted our children with Becca. Today, I strongly encourage you to trust Park City with her. You could not leave the town in better hands.

Vote for Becca on November 3rd.

Maggie AbuHaidar

Park Meadows

* * *

Give to the groups that matter to you

Editor:

In only a few days, the entire community has an opportunity to come together for 24 hours of giving in support of Summit County’s nonprofits. Whether it’s a clinic for the uninsured, our superb trails network, an NP- affiliated radio station keeping you informed, or a domestic violence shelter where victims have someplace to run, I urge you to support your favorite nonprofits during Live PC Give PC on Friday, Nov. 6. The Park City Community Foundation is once again leading Live PC Give PC, presenting a 24-hour opportunity to donate online to nonprofits that improve lives, even save lives in Summit County. Peace House depends largely on gifts from the community to fund the shelter that last year gave refuge to more than 120 adults and children fleeing domestic abuse. We hope you will join the community in giving to the causes that matter most to you, and please consider an online gift to Peace House.

Sincerely,

Jane Patten, Executive Director

Peace House

* * *

Becca knows best

Editor:

In the past few issues, people have written in to support candidates for City Council, and I’d like to give a voice to Becca Gerber. I do this as a small business owner and someone who has known Becca for seven years. Becca is the only candidate who has lived in Park City since childhood and has seen its evolution over the years. Today, Becca is the Director of Sales and Marketing at Aloha Ski & Snowboard, President of the Board of the Historic Park City Alliance, and a member of Park City Recreation Advisory Board. Through these select examples, Becca has demonstrated that she is a natural leader and advocate for the residents of Park City. We need elected officials who can empathize with the challenges faced by our community members and stand for those who haven’t had a voice on this council. I trust Becca to make informed decisions that will benefit the Park City community. You can learn more about Becca at beccaforparkcity.com and in the Park Record’s Voter Guide.

Lance Anderson

Park City

* * *

Hope Melville offers our citizens a voice

Editor:

You may not have met Hope Melville, but you should. You may not have heard her speak, but you should. You may not have reviewed her qualifications, but you should!

Hope is a talented, experienced and involved citizen who offers a real positive change for our city government. Look at her detailed website, HopeForPC.com for yourself and I believe that you will learn about someone you can enthusiastically support in this Park City Council election.

The next four years will offer many serious challenges for Park City. It is vitally important that our representatives assess the issues analytically and make good decisions that benefit our community as a whole. Hope’s strong intellect and varied background pair perfectly with the fact that she has no vested interests except the good of our community. Having known Hope for many years, we wholeheartedly endorse her for a position on City Council.

Jane and David Gorrell

Park Meadows

* * *

Bond opposition: not in my backyard

Editor:

Recently a teacher friend reached out to me regarding Prop 1 due to my husband’s involvement in the long-term education planning process. Here’s what I shared with her based on his engagement:

I think the money being spent is being spent wisely. As with all things like this, the communications are different from some of the facts.

For me it comes down to:

1. Getting the money now while the bond will be more affordable.

2. Wanting 9th in the high school and hoping to spare my son from Treasure Mtn.

3. Seeing what went on behind the scenes to make this possible and knowing that there is a solid and thoughtful plan behind it.

I think people believe it happened too fast. Which, having lived through it isn’t so valid for me but I know the nitty gritty. There is a thoughtful measured plan behind the financial proposal.

We all know the district has a communications challenge and haven’t expressed well the benefits of this plan. And while it’s true the district isn’t implementing what was originally recommended by the committee, I think it’s smart to build the sports complex now and not wait to raise yet another bond or tax.

I think the momentum behind the "no" campaign isn’t as transparent as they say: lots of residents in prospector and park meadows are really saying: not in my backyard, while using the propaganda of "our kids deserve better" — which I think is inauthentic.

Sara Bresee-Morgan

Park City

* * *

Bond marred by poor communication

Editor:

I’m voting "Yes" on the school bond, Proposition 1. Even though the school board has been weird about the way it explains the bond, I think it’s time to increase classroom space and improve the athletic and performing arts sections of the high school.

The board has not been secretive about this project. It has been too wordy. The meetings go on and on and on. They’ve been hashing this out for more than a year and issuing statements dense with bureaucrat-speak.

But after filtering out the confusing bluster and threats of a tax increase, I found the board had good reasoning. Treasure Mountain Jr. High’s teachers and staff are awesome, but the building sucks. It needs to be knocked down. Moving the 9th graders to the high school makes sense because their grades are part of their high school transcript. And about 350 TMJH students walk to the high school every day any way. Moving 8th graders to Ecker Hill leverages the larger lockers and halls already available at that school.

Student enrollment may not have grown as much as expected this year, but one of the first steps to getting smaller classes is to make sure we have enough classrooms. The high school already is at 102 percent of capacity, so more classroom space is a good thing.

Regarding the $12 million for athletic facilities, I’m a STEM supporter, but in my 11 years as a school volunteer, I have seen how athletics, music, and art teach lessons that students don’t always get in a typical classroom. These activities can teach our kids not only to be resilient workers, but to be better humans. So, yeah, this 18 percent of the investment is worth it, to me.

Let’s approve this bond and get the improvements underway.

Ben Ling

Park City

* * *

Bond proponents confusing the voters

Editor:

Interesting statement by the school board.

-August 11, 2015 — Park City School District listed the bond projects on the District website as $83+ million.

-August 18, 2015 — without a single set of blueprints nor cutting projects from $83 million list, the School Board listed the Projects for the bond: "At total cost $66,306,336…" The total bond is $56 million (note — the poll commissioned by the District said voters would pass that amount):

  • PCHS Expansion including gymnasium remodel – $27,500,000
  • New 5/6 School at EHMS Campus – $24,800,000
  • McPolin Student Safety Improvements – $1,400,000
  • Treasure Mountain Junior High Demolition – $606,336
  • Athletic Facilities Improvements – $12,000,000

Where did the board get these numbers? They claim they used the numbers from Master Planning Committee’s estimates (also did not have blueprints). Unfortunately when it came to the "Athletic Facilities", PCSD created a number that kept them below 20%. For instance from the Master Planning Final Document (7/31/2015) just on the Field House, "The facility is fairly costly and will likely cost $10-$12 million even for a stripped down facility. A full-blown athletic facility would cost upwards of $20,000,000." Not estimates used by the District.

One reason the voters are confused is they can add up the athletic facility costs (given to me by Todd Hauber):

Athletic Facilities costs:

1. Move Dozier Field and new stadium — $3,855,000

2. New Field House — $6,860,000.

3. New track relocated to North 40 — $1,285,000

This adds up to $12 million or 18 percent of the full $66 million project.

Unfortunately these are not all of the athletic facilities in the project. Add $6,360,750 for the gym remodel, new locker rooms, sports offices in the high school to the $12 million. Therefore over 33 percent more money belongs in Athletic Facilities.

The total is $18,360,750 divided by $66 million and the Athletic Facilities percentage is 28 percent.

Use the $10 million or less from Reserves over the next year to pay for architects/engineers; and give us a better plan.

Vote NO on Prop 1 this year for the benefit of the students and the community.

Bill Humbert

Park City

* * *

Please support The Park City Institute

Editor:

My name is Josie Slobodow. I am a dancer and student at Treasure Mountain Junior High. This year for Live PC Give PC I am supporting The Park City Institute. The Park City Institute has given me many amazing opportunities. I have done outreach programs with professional dance companies they have brought to Park City to perform. I have also been a guest speaker for them to help fund their programs. Please help me support The Park City Institute and our local nonprofit organizations through Live PC Give PC on Nov. 6.

Josie Slobodow

Treasure Mountain Junior High School

* * *

Live PC Give PC at Treasure Mountain

Editor:

I am an eighth grade student at Treasure Mountain Junior High. This year, I am part of Julie Hooker’s Leadership II. We are doing our best to support our community nonprofits by participating in Live PC Give PC.

We have created a competition between our 2Red classes for who can collect the most money. All money collected will be donated to nonprofits involved in Live PC Give PC. To encourage students and teachers to donate we are giving them a reward. The class that raises the most money will receive a donut party. The teacher of that class will receive a $25 gift card to Amazon. The teachers who don’t have a class at that time, as well as the faculty, will also be involved in the competition. We are hoping each class will be able to raise at least $25. As a school, we plan to raise $1,000 to support the nonprofits that support us, including The Park City Institute, The People’s Health Clinic, Wasatch Backcountry Rescue, and EATS.

Carley Rogers

Treasure Mountain Junior High School

* * *

Our City Council needs Becca and Rory

Editor:

With Vail Resorts moving to town, Park City is entering a particularly challenging planning and development phase. We need a smart and sophisticated City Council to contend with Vail. Becca is engaged and energized and thinks outside the box. She is keenly in-tune with what locals value and she is passionate about preserving what we have and making it better. As a respected developer and former, very effective, planning commissioner, Rory has the depth of experience that is critically important to negotiate with the likes of Vail Resorts. Our City Council needs Becca and Rory to successfully navigate the challenges ahead, and they’ve got my vote.

Laura Suesser

Old Town Resident

* * *

Support Wasatch Back Trees for Live PC Give PC

Editor:

Trees make a neighborhood. We are lucky, in Summit County, to have Wasatch Back Trees, a non-profit organization dedicated to preserving, caring for, and planting trees. This year, Wasatch Back Trees gave hundreds of pounds of fresh-picked apples to the Park City Christian Center’s food bank, thanks to the great volunteers in our new Fruit Nuts program. Hundreds of pounds of slightly bruised fruit went to the volunteers who came to pick. And the lucky goats, pigs, horses, and deer in Summit County are eating up the "bad apples." Because there are no bad apples at Fruit Nuts. We take all of the apples, leaving the trees free of rotting windfall fruit which could breed disease for the upcoming year.

We have worked hard to plant, water and maintain shade trees in Francis and South Summit Parks, and at Park City High School; we have planted almost 2000 seedlings to help with reforestation efforts at Canyons; we have distributed almost 800 seedlings to local fourth and fifth graders; and we have adopted nine healthy, neglected apple trees for pruning, thinning, and their abundant yearly harvests.

If you love trees, consider giving to Wasatch Back Trees during the Live PC Give PC campaign this November 6th, 2015.

Barbara Richardson

Kamas

* * *

Gerber an invigorating candidate

Editor:

Our community is fortunate to have six incredible candidates stand up and run for a seat on City Council this election season. If you’ve been able to attend any of the public candidate forums you’ve likely heard the issues and perhaps even identified with a candidate or two. It seems as if the big issues facing our community are surrounding growth (and change), and while this isn’t necessarily a new challenge it has recently elevated.

In general, we as humans tend to be wary of change. It can be hard and even unpleasant, but it can also be invigorating and exciting. Park City is destined to change. Just as most of us have fallen in love with this charming community more will continue to do so as time goes on. I believe we must elect leaders who are energized by change; leaders who are capable of gracefully preparing our community for inevitable change. I believe Becca Gerber is one of those leaders.

I’ve always been inspired by those who when faced with a challenge turn to optimism. I’ve always admired those who find strength when solving a problem. I’ve always respected those who stand up for what they believe in and serve as a voice for others with smaller voices. Becca Gerber embodies each of characteristics (and more) and deserves our admiration, our respect and our vote. Our community is privileged to have Becca willing and able to serve in a leadership position at this point in her life. She brings a diverse perspective to our community leadership.

Regardless of what happens next Tuesday, I’d like to thank Becca Gerber for putting her hat in the ring and standing up for our generation.

Educate yourself on the issues and choose who you feel best represents you. Local elections matter, I know who will get my votes.

Meisha Lawson Ross

Park City

* * *

Vote Rory for Council

Editor:

Rory Murphy is a unique individual given the depth and breadth of his history in Park City.

As a past executive with United Park City Mines, he has an in-depth understanding of mine waste reclamation, water issues, and complex land use projects. As a private developer Rory has been an exemplary person when it comes to his own projects. Those projects included onsite affordable housing and historic preservation which have received well-deserved praise for honest delivery on his promises. Further, he has a history of service to this community and his willingness to serve on the Council is just a further testament to his commitment to our town. Please join me in supporting Rory.

Bradley Olch

Former Mayor

* * *

Becca Gerber for Council

Editor:

We need someone on the council to represent our kids who are trying to make it here in Park City.

Many of us who have been here since the 70’s made our way in this town, raised our kids here, made a living, sent them to college. Now we would love to have our children stay here too and make a living, so we can enjoy our families and watch our grandchildren grow. It is very tough for them to do that in this economy. Becca Gerber understands this better than anyone. She grew up here, she lives here, she plays here, and works here, and wants to stay here. She is willing to work to make that possible for the friends and families she grew up with.

  • Becca has energy, enthusiasm and creativity to deal with the demands of council, and help solve problems.
  • Becca represents a younger demographic in Park City that needs to be heard.
  • Becca is smart.
  • Becca is a collaborator. She reads, meets with people and attends as many meetings as she can to research the issues.
  • Becca is a team player and a leader. She has volunteered her time for the Recreation Board, the Park City Historic Alliance and is now the president of that organization.
  • Becca is positive and looks for solutions so people can work together.

    I believe Becca Gerber should take a seat on the Park City Council. Join me in voting for Becca on November 4.

    Sydney Reed

    Park City

    * * *

    I support Andy for City Council

    Editor:

    I support Andy for City Council because Andy has the positive enthusiasm, energy, and the ability to unite by finding common sense solutions to challenges as well as thorough insight of the Park City tourism based economy. I have worked with Andy on issues facing Park City businesses, and I am impressed with his willingness to delve into complex issues. Andy is an analytical thinker who works tirelessly to find long term solutions balancing the complex needs of the residents, the environment, and the business community. As a Main Street business person, Andy uniquely has experience working with the many events that we host here in Park City and how those events impact residents, businesses, and visitors. Andy understands the needs and behavior patterns of Park City’s diverse visitor profiles and how to balance those with the needs of residents. I know Andy is the right person to tackle the issues we face as a community and find ways to keep the Park City character and diversity needed in a sustainable community.

    Monty Coates

    Park City

    * * *

    I’m voting for Park City

    Editor:

    There are several excellent candidates for the upcoming municipal election. Unfortunately, those of us who reside in the unincorporated Snyderville Basin cannot vote for any of them. But we can cast our vote for Park City! How? participating in Live PC Give PC on Friday, November 6th and donating to the non-profit organization of your choice we aid and strengthen our town. Whether you chose to improve our trail system, preserve open space, help provide affordable housing or support our community voice, KPCW, your Live PC Give PC donation is your vote for Park City. So please join the fun by going to livepcgivepc.org and support the causes that matter most to you. And let’s not forget the great folks at the Park City Community Foundation who created and produce this event (and many others) for the betterment of our community. They need your support, too. Vote for Park City on November 6th!

    Bob Richer

    Snyderville Basin

    * * *

    School bond would have adverse effects

    Editor:

    There is much information available about the school bond, Proposition 1. With election day coming up it may be helpful to think about just a few points:

    -The public schools need all the support we can muster.

    -At $56 million this is the biggest school bond ever.

    -The school board did an admirable job of working through the issues in accordance with the timeline, but the opinions of those who have been involved in school and community issues for decades were largely overlooked.

    -The school realignment would entail middle school children riding buses for a significant portion of their day.

    -Treasure Mountain Nature Preserve, which was established and has been maintained since the 1990’s by teachers, students, neighbors, artists, scientists and scouts WILL BE adversely affected by the addition of bright lights and high volume amplification from a nearby athletic facility.

    We all agree that that our children need the very best educational systems and athletic facilities. A more prolonged evaluation period including public input would resolve the remaining issues.

    Duna Strachan

    Park City

    * * *

    Gerber best choice in qualified field

    Editor:

    We are fortunate to live in a community with so many capable and dedicated candidates running for City Council. Their histories of service to our Country and to our community are nothing short of remarkable. I’m honestly in awe of every single one of them. It makes me proud to call Park City my home. At the end of the day we would be well served as constituents by any of these potential Council members but Becca Gerber stands out as someone unique. Becca brings with her an agenda and a demographic that we must have represented for the future health of Park City. In other words, we need to have Council members who have skin in game. We need a City Council members who are experiencing first-hand the very issues that we are addressing as a community and members who are home grown and understand what it means to truly be "from" Park City. Becca uniquely meets all of these qualifications.

    Please join me in supporting Becca: a voice that we need on our City Council to represent and usher in a new generation of engaged citizens.

    Kathy Meyer

    Park City

    * * *

    Trust the school’s experts

    Editor:

    Let’s not use the polls to micromanage the Park City School District. Certainly one can question elements of their bond proposal, but who is better qualified to do long-term planning for the district than the professional educators we have assigned to run the district lo these many years? Anybody can raise a question, but very few have a better answer.

    One of the severe problems professional educators face today is the frequent meddling and second-guessing at all levels that prevents them from exercising their professional judgment. We send that message of no-confidence too often already, with the result that the best people eventually leave, to be replaced by political sycophants who are truly adept at ruining the schools. When you hire good people and let them do their jobs, things always turn out better.

    Tax-supported institutions should have reasonable oversight, by all means. If this district had a record of poor decisions and reckless actions, serious opposition to the bond proposal would be appropriate. But they don’t, and it’s not. Park City schools are in decent shape and getting better. Why force them to cancel plans, retrench, and set back school improvements a few more years? Get a grip on your hubris , back off and let the pros do their jobs in a timely way, by voting yes on the school district bond.

    Tom Horton

    Park City

    * * *

    Council needs new blood

    Editor:

    We are fortunate as a community to have very qualified candidates for the three council seats. As I narrowed down my choices, there are certain commonalities that candidates have shared for several decades. Open space preservation, environmentalism and affordable housing have been a common thread in our elections, it would be next to impossible to get elected without being a supporter of these core values.

    There are several areas of concern that I have in terms of the actions of our government over the past year or so. The building on the top of Main Street that was approved without planning commission or council review shows a major flaw in our process, the discussion of potential housing on the library field and the Envision Utah growth study were a waste of time and money. The Mountain Accord public input sessions have been offensive in that the public was continually shut down in their opposition to the light rail concept, which is -still in the documentation, and still listed as being considered for funding. When Vail announced they would now just be referred to as Park City, not one elected official stood up and said "hell no", Vail is now an integral part of our brand, not the other way around.

    I therefore cannot support the incumbent, who I both like and respect, but our officials need to be held accountable for their actions. When I look at the backgrounds, community experience and passions of the other candidates, I think the Nann Worel, Rory Murphy and Becca Gerber would bring new vision to the council and our community.

    Dana Williams

    Park City

    * * *

    School bond an amazing opportunity

    Editor:

    We have researched and attended meetings. We have been parent volunteers for eight years. This bond is an amazing opportunity to improve our schools. It is way overdue. We would vote for a higher bond amount because we will need it soon enough. Voting no because it is not exact fit for you simply means all students lose. Vote yes and get involved with how the money is spent.

    Christie Worthington and Jeff Farber

    TSES and TMJH parents

    * * *

    Murphy, Worel and Beerman will make a positive difference

    Editor:

    We find ourselves lucky this voting season, with great people running for City Council, and I thank them all for running!

    As a 40-year involved resident of Park City, I’ll be voting for Rory Murphy, Nann Worel, and Andy Beerman.

    Rory Murphy brings knowledge of our government and a solid record of service to the table. Rory has served on many Boards and Committees, including Planning Commission, Chair- Sundance Advisory Committee, Summit County Judicial Selection, Park City Soils, and Wasatch County Roads, to name a few. He understands the importance of reaching out to our neighboring Counties, Cities and Towns, for the benefit of everyone. As a developer, he’s proved that development can be smart and positive, going the extra mile to preserve Historic Buildings, Open Space, to bring in Arts and Activities in many forms and to keep the Resort feeling of Park City alive. A vote for Rory Murphy will allow him to continue to make a difference in our future.

    Nann Worel is thoughtful, kind and intelligent. As a Planning Commissioner, now Chair, she understands how our government works. She carefully listens to all sides of an issue, before making a considered, clear opinion, even on difficult decisions. Nann leads by example through her service and leadership. This is evidenced by her positions at Peoples’ Health Clinic, the Library Board, Summit County Arts, Peace House, Arts Kids, to name a few of her roles making a positive difference. Nann will serve us very well as a City Council member and will arrive informed and ready.

    Andy Beerman has been leading the way in Park City for many years, as a business leader, an active citizen and a City Councilor. Because of his record, I’m voting for incumbent, Andy, to return to the Council, so he can continue to help us with his strong negotiating skills, his fairness, and also his reaching out beyond Park City to our neighboring communities. Reelect Andy so he can continue in his great endeavors.

    Liza Simpson and Dick Peek, retiring Councilors, will be missed. Thanks to both of them for their service!

    Donna VanBuren

    Park City

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    Dozier demolition sends the wrong message

    Editor:

    Last week I did something totally out of character: I voted "no" on the school bond/Prop 1. I am someone who highly values education, and am willing to pay even higher taxes than those that would be incurred by the proposed bond. However, I cannot support wasteful spending and blatant disregard for the recommendations of the community and the Master Plan committee.

    Overwhelmingly in meetings to present the Master Plan, the feedback from the community was NOT to demolish and relocate Dozier field. The reasons to oppose this move are many, including the fact that we recently spent a LOT of money to make improvements to Dozier field. Why are those improvements not valued?

    Furthermore, if a new stadium were to be built on the Treasure Mountain site, it would literally be right next to a wildlife sanctuary. This sanctuary was not only expensive to build, but it won awards, and is used by the schools to educate our students about wildlife and the environment and conservation. It doesn’t take a consultant to tell us that the loud noises, bright lights and litter generated by a stadium will have a negative effect on the sanctuary and the animals that use it. Where are those animals going to go when they are frightened off by a new stadium? They certainly are not going to be welcomed at the Park Meadows golf course. What are we trying to teach our children: that animal sanctuaries and science studies of the environment are of no importance?

    Tearing down Dozier field and putting a new stadium in a quiet neighborhood next to a wildlife sanctuary is a bad idea that does not deserve to be supported by a school bond.

    Bonnie Brown

    Park City

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    Experience counts

    Editor:

    We are very fortunate to have such a quality field of candidates running for City Council.

    As I decide for whom I will be voting I realize that 3 candidates have the experience needed to be immediately effective City Council members: Rory Murphy, Andy Beerman, Nann Worel.

    I will vote for these three.

    Jan Wilking

    Park City

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    In council election, think Gerber

    Editor:

    As a local resident who has lived in the area since 1986, I feel extremely fortunate to have enjoyed the great quality of life here. Through the years, my family and I have benefited from all the wonderful services and recreation that Park City has to offer. That’s why I think it’s important that the people of Park City elect City Council members who will preserve that quality of life, while being respectful of Park City’s distinguished history. Becca Gerber is exactly the right person for that job.

    In the last 10 years, I’ve come to know Becca Gerber and have been impressed not only with all her personal and professional accomplishments, but with her dedication to Park City and its future. She understands that, while we want to continue to improve what Park City has to offer, it has to be done in a way that’s thoughtful and forward-thinking. Becca offers a fresh outlook that Park City needs. Her leadership skills, her intellect, her boundless enthusiasm and loyalty to Park City will help her get the job done as City Councilwoman.

    Please cast your vote for Becca Gerber on November 3.

    Erni Armstrong

    Park City

    Bond opponents have corporate support

    Editor:

    It’s come to my attention that our local corporate citizen Nutraceutical is contributing to the effort to defeat our local school bond. They have, in fact, funded about half of the campaign so far, I believe; to the order of $2,000.

    The information is available at disclosures.utah.gov. Search "Citizens For A Better Education."

    Small potatoes, I’m sure, to a company like Nutraceutical, but I don’t understand why a publicly-held corporation is so engaged in our town’s politics, and against its elected school board, and I wonder what the NUTR board and stockholders would think of this expenditure.

    Corporate "personhood" and Citizens United are issues for another day.

    This strange political marriage and the constant barrage of already-rebutted half-truths and shrill misrepresentations from the bond’s opponents have turned this bond election into a sort of microcosm of the dysfunction we see at a national level. It seems too personal and a bit ideological.

    Take time to educate yourself on the facts and realities of the issue and vote accordingly. Here are a few worth considering: Few of us don’t support quality education. Good schools require continuing investment but return dividends. Our community is growing. Financing will become more expensive if we don’t act soon. Bonding ensures our money stays in our district and is spent on our schools. These funds cannot be turned to higher pay or additional positions, unfortunately. The plan and the bond have been debated and researched ad nauseum – publicly. Being late to the game doesn’t mean you weren’t invited. There are no new angles or issues that haven’t been considered by those involved all along.

    Vote "yes," support our schools, and invest in our future.

    Shannon O’Neal

    Park City

    PCSD masterplan needs to be revised in order to earn public support

    Editor:

    Citizens for Better Education was formed to oppose the 2015 school bond because many citizens felt that the bond plan was not the best for Park City’s education and community.

    Paying for capital projects through a bond may be wise financially, but rushing a plan that has significant impact on our community, kids, and educational system, doesn’t seem worth the dollars saved. Some people are even asking whether this plan does enough to set up the school district intelligently and wisely for the future. Certainly, citizens recognize that facility and systemic improvements are needed in the local educational system and they want to help achieve those. But with this year’s enrollment well below the level projected in the district plan and with enough money in the capital fund to undertake several needed improvements, voters have the opportunity to reject this capital plan and instead engage in a dialogue to craft a plan we can be excited to approve.

    Unfortunately, the process the school board took attracted input from only 2% of the greater Park City community and has left many people still asking questions about these facility changes. As such, your consideration of this vote is critical. You can find more information on Facebook by searching Citizens for Better Education. It’s important to think twice: once these buildings, fields, and additions are constructed or demolished, they can’t be changed. Let’s vote "AGAINST" the district’s request to issue bonds so that the greater Park City community can continue a conversation about local education that has really just begun.

    Ali Ziesler

    Co-chair, Citizens for Better Education

    Bond opponents aren’t acting in community’s best interest

    Editor:

    All of these school projects approved are timely and critical. The opposition group should be ashamed. Most of these bullies simply don’t want any changes occurring in their backyard. They have shamelessly lied at every opportunity, over and over.

    The truth is, five of seven Park City schools are at capacity. School tax rates have actually dropped over the past 10 years. The bond rates are at historic lows. The ‘athletic’ facilities will be used for a multitude of other events, sporting and otherwise (currently there is nowhere for PCHS students to gather – they maximize Eccles Center fire code). Without the bond passage, the kids suffer worst. They will be forced into classrooms in trailers and slog through facilities inferior to most others in the state.

    Learn the facts – http://www.pcschools.us/woadlocal/media/bond/newest_jleoct_22revised_faq_s.pdf

    Jodi Derber

    Park City