PCHS wrestler Cameron Shine pins down opportunity | ParkRecord.com

PCHS wrestler Cameron Shine pins down opportunity

Two days before Park City High School's first wrestling match of the season, the Miners were practicing their pins.

Two wrestlers worked through a move called "the stack" while senior Cameron Shine watched.

"So I go low, right?" the wrestler initiating the stack asked.

Shine, who wore an olive-green shirt and stands a few inches shy of 6 feet with curly black hair and a wiry frame, pointed.

"Yeah, pull up the elbow, circle your legs all the way around before you get the half," he said.

"Here?" the wrestler asked.

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"Yeah, stick the half in, and roll him over this shoulder."

The top wrestler rolled both of them over, so the bottom wrestler was on top of him except for his back and neck, which were on the ground.

"Yeah, and he's stuck," Shine said.

It was a typical practice for Shine. According to his coach Tony Pelegrin, he spends a lot of time helping the team. Pelegrin is thankful for the assistance.

"We do get a lot of new kids; probably half our team has never wrestled before," Pelegrin said. "He's one of the kids that doesn't mind you asking him questions. … He'll reach out to the kids that are in more of a shell, because he's fairly outgoing."

Shine started wrestling three years ago, after a friend recommended it to him.

"I think winning a wrestling match is probably one of the greatest feelings," he said. "Because it's really intimidating to go out there, because it's all on you. Everyone is watching and when you win it's a fantastic feeling, for sure."

But he had to wait a while before the wins started coming consistently. In fact, he described his skill level as "absolute garbage," during his first year.

"It's an intimidating sport," he said. "But it's one of those sports where you work hard, you'll reap the benefits."

And Shine is familiar with hard work. For an example, he looks no further than his father.

"My dad is an incredibly hard worker," he said. "He'll work seven days a week, four weeks straight, like 14 hour days. His work means a lot to him and that inspired me at a young age. I've been working hard all high school."

It's been paying off. Last year he was one of Park City's best wrestlers and competed in the state tournament. According to Pelegrin, Shine also got a 35 on his ACT.

When asked what attending college means to him, Shine said he saw it as "the door to the rest of his life."

But so far, he's not sure which door will open to him.

"I have no clue where I'm going to college," he said. "I have to apply to (University of California) Berkeley and UCLA by 11 tonight or something. I finished the essays today."

Shine said he applied to every school he is interested in within an hour of their deadlines.

"I have a bunch of schools I would really like to go to, we'll just see where I get in," he said.

Until then, he'll stick with the Miners, helping roll out the mats and point out technique.

"We're all helping each other out," he said. "It's not like competition between the teams."

He pointed at one of the wrestlers.

"We are wrestling off later," Shine said. "It's going to be good for him, and I'm going to help him during the match and he'll learn from that. I think that's a really good mindset."

Then he looked back to the two Miners on the mat, who had just rolled through another stack.

"Yeah, Chris," Shine said. "That was, like, spot on."