Park City plans to build Old Town trailhead, providing easy access to Treasure acreage | ParkRecord.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Park City plans to build Old Town trailhead, providing easy access to Treasure acreage

Park City plans to build a trailhead in Old Town offering access to the City Hall-owned Treasure acreage. The trailhead will be located on Lowell Avenue just north of the Empire Avenue switchback.
Courtesy of Park City Municipal Corp.

Park City plans to build a trailhead in Old Town designed to offer easy access to the City Hall-owned Treasure acreage and highlight the community’s silver-mining heritage, coupling two issues — open space and history — dear to Parkites.

The trailhead will be located on Lowell Avenue just north of the Empire Avenue switchback. There will be space for five vehicles in a parking area that will be built as part of the trailhead. The parking area will be for summertime use. A kiosk with a map of the Treasure land, a trash can and a bag dispenser for animal waste are also planned. The trailhead will serve a new trail City Hall also plans to build on the Treasure acreage, which stretches across a hillside overlooking Old Town along the route of the Town Lift. A bronze sculpture of the late Richard Martinez, who was a legendary Park City silver miner, will be placed at the trailhead.

The Park City Planning Department on Tuesday approved the work administratively.

The Park City Council in mid-September is expected to award a contract for the construction of the trailhead. The work could start by the end of that month. City Hall hopes to finish the project by the end of 2020.

The new trail will be usable during the warm-weather months but will not be accessible during the winter. The new trail on the Treasure land will connect with a network that links to points across Park City and the Snyderville Basin.

The trailhead construction will follow approximately 18 months after City Hall acquired the acreage in a $64 million conservation deal, by a wide margin the municipal government’s most expensive land deal. The acquisition ended a long-running development dispute.


Support Local Journalism

Support Local Journalism

Readers around Park City and Summit County make the Park Record's work possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to deliver quality, locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is critical to help us keep our community informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, however large or small, will make a difference.

Each donation will be used exclusively for the development and creation of increased news coverage.

 

Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User